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UKIPO Consultation – Industrial Strategy: Intellectual Property call for views

ConsultationThe UK Intellectual Property Office has issued a consultation calling for views on “maximising the incentives of the Intellectual Property system to stimulate collaborative innovation and licensing opportunities”. The consultation, “Industrial Strategy: Intellectual Property Call for Views [PDF]” closes on 15 November 2017.

The consultation forms part of the government’s plans for an “ambitious new industrial strategy” and asks the question what can the government do to encourage innovators to do more collaboration and commercialisation and to stimulate knowledge exchange and follow-on innovation. (more…)

IPcopy is 5! – Our Top 10 posts from the last 5 years

file2611249338382While listening to the radio last week I had cause to feel old when the presenter introduced the next track as celebrating 19 years of airplay. The track in question? Britney Spears’ “Hit Me Baby One More Time”. Unbelievably this was released in 1998 and even more unbelievably it was almost considered for the group Five….

Another  “where has the time gone?” moment came later in the week when our blog notification alert went off to note that IPcopy is five years old. This got us thinking about our most viewed posts and so here are our top 10 patent, trade mark and IP posts from our first five years. (more…)

European Commission Brexit Paper on Intellectual Property – a closer look

brexit-1481028_1920As noted in our post earlier this week, the European Commission has released its position paper on the treatment of intellectual property (IP) rights (including geographical indicators) after the UK completes its exit from the EU. It sets out general principles on unitary IP rights, geographical indicators, exhaustion, supplementary protection certificates and the protection of databases.

CITMA recently published its position paper on post-Brexit registered trade mark and design rights, and rights of representation. Many elements of the EU paper reflect the position of CITMA, in particular the unitary character of IP protection for European Union Trade Marks (EUTMs) in the UK and EU after the withdrawal date. However, there are two aspects of particular interest to UK practitioners that were not addressed: rights of representation and reciprocity of UK geographical indicators. (more…)

Imposter Syndrome – an IP Inclusive Webinar

IP InclusiveKeltie was pleased to be one of the hosts of IP Inclusive’s recent webinar on Imposter Syndrome with guest speaker Jo Maughan. The session was chaired by Carol Arnold with contributions from Andrea Brewster. (more…)

Top 5 Tips to help spot Misleading Invoices

DSC03616-BOur first article on misleading invoices was published in 2013. Four years on this issue is still unfortunately of relevance to all IP right holders who need to be aware of invoices received from unfamiliar companies. (more…)

IP News Nuggets

newspapers_Some snippets of news today on IPcopy including .africa domain names, updates to the UPC CMS and a new IP Inclusive event. (more…)

Patents for the Summer Holidays

Motorised ice cream cone

Summer is here which can mean only one thing. It’s time to give you a run down of the weird and wacky intersection of the vacation industry and the patent system! (more…)

How Wimbledon secured their colour mark

Wimbledon

Photo courtesy of Roy Scott

In a first for IPcopy, we have a podcast for you today!

Zane Shihab,  partner at Kerman & Co LLP, and Manuela Macchi, partner at Keltie LLP, speak to LawInSport CEO, Sean Cottrell and Editor, Chris Bond about the importance of trade mark registration in sport and take review the merits of Wimbledon’s successful registration of the purple and green colour mark.  (more…)

20 Years on – Hong Kong and the Handover

hong-kong-1791067_1280

Image from pixabay.com

IPcopy is delighted to post the following article from Tim Hancock at Haldanes in Hong Kong in advance of the 20th anniversary of the Hong Kong Handover.

It is hard to believe that 20 years have passed since the event that dominated headlines at the time.  30 June 1997 was the last day that sovereignty in Hong Kong resided in United Kingdom.  1 July 1997 was the first day on which China re-acquired that sovereignty.  Many colonial powers have returned control of their former dominions to the inhabitants.  The situation in Hong Kong, with sovereignty transferred to a different country, was unique.  Portugal then reached a similar arrangement with China in relation to Macau, but that grabbed less attention as the transfer took place on 1 January 2000 (a date on which there was considerable competition for headline news).

I have many vivid memories of the time.  Rain is one such memory – almost as much rain as fell on INTA when it was held in Hong Kong in 2014.  I also remember Chinese troops pouring over the border (only to return the next day – not to be seen again).  Others will have their own memories, but for readers under 35, perhaps a brief history will help place the event in context. (more…)

IP Unjustified Threats Act 2017

WestminsterIn what has been a politically and legislatively busy period, IPcopy notes that the new Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Act 2017 was granted Royal Assent on 27 April 2017. The purpose of this act is, in essence, to prevent groundless threats being issued against a party relating to purported IP rights while harmonising the position across patent, trade mark and design rights. Currently available provisions can expose an IP rights holder with a potentially genuine claim to the risk of becoming a defendant themselves, resulting in the rights holder bearing the burden of proof of infringement. For a claimant who may be financially unable to expose themselves to such a risk, this potentially provided a steep barrier to entry and could lead to genuine grievances being abandoned. It is also acknowledged that, whilst it is necessary to offer a defendant a method of defence against a baseless and aggressive threat, it has the potential to create an overly litigious atmosphere, and disputes which could be solved with discussion are instead hauled in front of the courts.

The reforms presented in the Act aim to remove such deficiencies by more clearly defining what does and does not constitute a ‘threat.’ In addition, provisions are now included which bring trade mark and design legislation into accordance with the position for patents. A summary of the key changes brought into effect with this Act are outlined below. (more…)